Play = Healthy Brain

Playing is something that we have always encouraged our children to do – it keeps them entertained, builds social skills and promotes creativity. Although sometimes they have a hard time remembering when it is appropriate to play (ahem…grocery store),  it is one of the many reasons that we have chosen to homeschool our children. There just wasn’t enough time devoted to unstructured play and free choice.  I have encountered the concept of play quite often in the last few weeks and it’s been on my mind daily as I work through my Tinkering class.  There is also much discussion and debate on the elusive definition of play and how it contributes to success (for humans and animals).

play_Ringling

Tinkering with the playground water station at The Ringling Museum in Sarasota, FL.

Currently, I am reading the book, Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul by Dr. Stuart Brown. One of the studies that this medical researcher highlights was done by Dr. Marian Diamond. In the 1960s, she studied rats and found that rats who “played” more – lots of new toys and were interactive with other rats – had bigger and more complex brains. Hence, propelling the notion that babies and young children who are exposed to many different enriching experiences may become more well developed (and smarter) adults. Dr. Montessori found the same thing in the early 1900s during her observational studies.

Interestingly enough, Dr. Diamond’s research found that that this “enrichment” was equally beneficial for ALL brains, of ALL ages (which reminds me of the research on how learning a new language is beneficial for your aging brain).  Dr. Brown’s book also suggests that adults need to play as well – though, our play can look a little different – reading, knitting, watching our favorite TV show, etc. Yet, this probably explains why I have been having so much fun tinkering.

My handmade battery-powered bracelet - with wired mini-LEDs.

My handmade battery-powered bracelet – with wired mini-LEDs.

The inside of the bracelet - sewn with conductive thread and attached to a coin battery using parallel circuits.

The inside of the bracelet – sewn with conductive thread and attached to a coin battery (currently missing) using parallel circuits.

This past week, I was introduced to paper and sewn circuits. I love, love, love them. I am starting to comprehend circuitry in a way that I hadn’t with our previous experiments. I have so much more to write about using paper, fabric and conductive thread to create circuits, but I’m not done playing yet. I haven’t quite figured out how everything works and I don’t want to spend time writing about it – I want to get back and continue playing. 🙂

The bracelet is currently pinned, but I want to add metal snaps as a switch, but I need to figure that out first!

The bracelet is currently pinned, but I want to add metal snaps as a switch, but I need to figure out how to do that first!