Book Review :: Minecraft for Makers

In an effort to utilize my librarian background, I review books. It keeps my librarian skills sharp, and I love talking about  – and analyzing – books. These reviews cover science and art education books, for and about children, as well as reality-based children’s books for a Montessori lifestyle. This post reviews the book, Minecraft for Makers.

A picture of the book, Minecraft for Makers Don’t mind the fact that this post has Halloween pictures, and…it’s almost Thanksgiving. We have been crazy busy -thankfully with good things- but that means very little time to publish thoughtful posts. However, I’m pushing forward and slowly making my way through an ever-expanding pile of MAKE books. I’m on the publisher’s list for certain MakerMedia book reviews. Often, a cardboard package will be waiting on our front porch and it’s always a race to see who opens the package first.

I can’t remember which child (or adult) opened this particular package, but I know I was the last person to sit down with this book. Oh, the delighted squeals that came from my family when they looked at the cover. A Minecraft book? for makers? You could pair anything with Minecraft and my boys would be all over it. This book was no exception.

A picture of a kid using a hot glue gun to create a Miinecraft for Maker inspired cube.

We always have popsicle sticks and hot glue on hand. I like these supplies because once the boys are tired of them, they burn nicely in our yearly bonfire.

Baichtal, John. Make: Minecraft for Makers: Minecraft in the Real World with LEGO, 3D Printing, Arduino, and More. MakerMedia: San Fransisco, 2017.

Target Audience: Older teens and makers in the their 20s. People with access to a local Makerspace.

Minecraft for Makers

My oldest son, 12, held onto it the longest. He is my biggest Minecraft player, and he is also in charge of the family Minecraft server. Although Dad submits the occasional help ticket, Ronan resets the server and installs the latest updates. Two years ago, he was the one who begged me for McEdit, a program that allows you to create Tinkercad drawings and import them into your local Minecraft world. It’s not a surprise my hands-on kid would be drawn to a Minecraft maker book. It was practically made just for him!

Except…it was a bit above his skill level. A lot of the projects combine some pretty cool, but expensive, hardware. The few simple projects rely on laser cutter access or Arduino programming knowledge. There’s also the small issue of referring to GitHub – where all of the book’s files are kept – with no instructions on how to use GitHub in this capacity. I’m a novice GitHub user and didn’t really want to create an account (FYI- you don’t need to create an account, but I couldn’t manipulate the size of the image without it).  I would have preferred a link to the Maker Media site. As far as audience goes, this book is definitely geared toward the high school or college programmer (or just out of college…seeing as how much the supplies cost).

Hacking Minecraft for Makers

Since the kids were a little overwhelmed at the “proper” projects, we chose to be inspired by the book instead. Halloween was quickly approaching so the kids took one look at the Minecraft Jack O’Lantern project and decided to create a replica, based on the supplies we had on hand. That means we didn’t use the AdaFruit NeoPixel Jewel or an Arduino (even though we own a RedBoard). For the non-Arduino user, Baichtal recommended the Flickery Flame Kit, but it wouldn’t have arrived in time for Halloween. The kids decided to use tiny LED candles, leftover from last Halloween. In short, this small-town family did what any maker (without Amazon Prime or a local Makerspace) would do: we improvised.

A picture of a cube covered in orange paper with a Minecraft faace cut out of it.

R, age 11, created this larger version of a Minecraft Jack O’Lantern.

I was the one stuck passing out candy while my husband, and the neighborhood dads, took the kids trick or treating. I can tell you that every costumed elementary and middle schooler commented on these lanterns. They immediately recognized them as Minecraft Jack O’Lanterns. They were almost as interested in them as the treats I was passing out.

A picture of a small wooden cube covered in orange paper to resemle a Minecraft Jack O'Lantern.

My two boys worked together on this one. C, age 8, built the frame and glued on the paper while his older brother used the exacto knife to cut out the face.

Finding the Right Audience

If my boys were older, I could see them tackling more of the projects in this book. They would be able to do them on their own – with very little help from the adults. However, most of the projects required a steady hand and some upper-level “maker” knowledge, not to mention a credit card to purchase supplies. This book wasn’t right for our family, but I could think of a couple of teenage boys who might be interested…

I received this book in exchange for my honest review. If you’d like to see my other (non-compensated) reviews of Make titles, check out Making Makers, Making Simple Robots, and Tinkering.