Florida Marine Ecology for Kids

This past weekend, my kids took part in a mock Florida Marine Ecology tournament, hosted by the Nature Coast Biological Station (an organization supported, in part, by the University of Florida). My kids attended due to their involvement with Florida 4-H.

a picture of a kid with a clipboard looking at a florida marine ecology specimen

C, age 8, writes down his guess for the specimen. I think it was a fiddler crab…

Although they have been 4-H members for a few years, they are still getting their feet wet. We’re not really into animal husbandry, but there are a number of other ways to be involved with this fabulous organization. My children have participated in the non-livestock fair. Last year, I even coached a First Lego League team through our local robotics club.

Experiential Learning – Beach Field Trips

This was the first year they participated with the marine ecology team. My youngest son is interested in marine ecology, so he was very excited such a team existed! Thankfully, we had two amazing parent leaders who prepared my boys (and others) for this mock tournament. The “actual” tournament was cancelled when the Florida governor recently cut 4-H funding.

However, I can say that my boys have learned a lot about our coastal flora and fauna. Beach trips take on new meanings. The boys can identify the plants and animals we see. When we visit our local museum, the kids are quick to point out the different Florida shells (by name).

Local Learning – Florida Science

As a native Floridian, I am amazed by all of the flora and fauna that exists in my wonderful state. Why didn’t I learn about these local plants and animals in public school? I was raised on the Gulf Coast, so I should know this stuff by heart. My elementary class visited a local reserve once or twice, but I wonder why it wasn’t a larger part of the curriculum? Or maybe it was, briefly, and my brain cleared out that space to make way for calculus. (Trust me – my brain cleared that information a long time ago).

In school, we learned about alligators, manatees, and the Florida panther, but I don’t remember learning about local beach plants. Until recently, I didn’t know Florida hosts the largest nesting area for the loggerhead sea turtle. Did you?

Yes, it was the kids’ decision to study this information, but I really enjoyed learning alongside them. Can’t you tell? Lucky for me, the kids are already planning for next year’s tournament. In the meantime, our field trips just became a lot more interesting.

a picture of a table with pictures of Florida marine ecology birds on it.

I didn’t want to interrupt the kids, so I just grabbed a few pictures. Too bad I didn’t get any of the live plant specimens.