Review – Code Monkey Island

Have you ever wanted to like something, but just couldn’t bring yourself to do so?

That’s how I feel about the game, Code Monkey Island.

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It has a lot going for it – it’s pretty, it has a catchy name and it does a beautiful job explaining how code works. The accompanying “textbook” is just fabulous and is a wonderful resource.

 

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Sadly, the game mechanics are somewhat lacking, and the game instructions are only 2-pages long. There is no description of how to move your monkeys from their start bubble and there are too many similar playing cards.

But the real deal killer?

It’s tedious to play. It’s right up there with Monopoly Jr., Chutes & Ladders and Candyland. All which were played once, and then banished from the house. It’s annoying to play a game that can go on forever, just for the sake of continuing.

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To be fair – Code Monkey Island did last for more than one playing. I had initially purchased it last summer for camp and my campers and I played it one afternoon. Unfortunately, those 8-10-year-olds found it a little too boring for their liking. Maybe that was because we had played (and enjoyed) Robot Turtles and Be the Robot.

However, before I gave up on it completely, I pulled it out last week and my own children and I sat down to play. We set up the game, skimmed the limited instructions and set off to immerse ourselves in the world of boolean logic, variables and monkeys. Sometimes we weren’t sure what to do (like how and when our monkeys could leave their start circle), so we made up some rules. All of that would have been okay, but then my kids started to play the dreaded “remove one of the monkeys from the banana stand” card. This allows a player to take another player’s monkey out of the “home” section. Thus, dragging on the game.

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Of course, you could always remove those cards, but I still think the overall game play is too tedious. My kids likened it to the game, Sorry! That’s a game they somewhat like, but that doesn’t get played as often as Settlers of Cataan or Ticket to Ride. Plus, they said they liked it even less than Sorry!, so it won’t be residing in the game closet.

This game might be better used as a tool to teach programming concepts. Perhaps, it could be made into a Montessori-like ‘work’ that could be placed on a shelf. Students could follow teacher-made cards (taken from the fabulous programming explanations) and create simple scenarios that students could run through. Or, maybe students could use it to write their own “monkey” programs using boolean statements…

Did I mention that it’s pretty?

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